Mautic Community Forums

Two Step Opt-In Page/Form Theme - A Hack Too Far?

I’ve been planning to create a few landing page/form themes for a little while and finally got around to producing the first. Inspiration was from one of Lead Pages’ free templates though as there’s no licensing included with those, there’s no code copied.



I’d planned to just embed the form in the page, but in the process ended up creating a two-step page.



These two grabs show how a styled version appears to a visitor.



front-1.jpg



front-2.jpg



You can see a front end example at https://hello.shoestringhustle.com. If you submit the form, you may or may not be opting in - can’t remember what’s been configured on that install yet.



It’s a bit of a hacky approach in so far as the slots for the modal are hidden in the editor preview until the user mouses over the container for the main button. Those slots are then revealed to allow them to be selected and edited.



editor-1.jpg



editor-2.jpg



I’ve uploaded the theme to Github at https://github.com/itp69/Bobbins-Mautic-Theme - it’s the first time I’ve added anything there so hopefully it’s correct.



I don’t think the back end experience is too ugly, though obviously a new slot type would be preferable (that’s beyond me) and I think I’ve read Froala’s going to be replaced at some point in the future.



If you try it, I would welcome feedback on the approach. An acceptable concept or should it be still born and concentrate on one step pages? It’s barely been tested, so there’ll surely be glitches in it. Any real gotchas I’ve overlooked with this solution?

I’ve been planning to create a few landing page/form themes for a little while and finally got around to producing the first. Inspiration was from one of Lead Pages’ free templates though as there’s no licensing included with those, there’s no code copied.

I’d planned to just embed the form in the page, but in the process ended up creating a two-step page.

These two grabs show how a styled version appears to a visitor.

You can see a front end example at https://hello.shoestringhustle.com. If you submit the form, you may or may not be opting in - can’t remember what’s been configured on that install yet.

It’s a bit of a hacky approach in so far as the slots for the modal are hidden in the editor preview until the user mouses over the container for the main button. Those slots are then revealed to allow them to be selected and edited.

I’ve uploaded the theme to Github at https://github.com/itp69/Bobbins-Mautic-Theme - it’s the first time I’ve added anything there so hopefully it’s correct.

I don’t think the back end experience is too ugly, though obviously a new slot type would be preferable (that’s beyond me) and I think I’ve read Froala’s going to be replaced at some point in the future.

If you try it, I would welcome feedback on the approach. An acceptable concept or should it be still born and concentrate on one step pages? It’s barely been tested, so there’ll surely be glitches in it. Any real gotchas I’ve overlooked with this solution?

Aside from the color scheme - but that really is a matter of taste - I love the landing page template! I will definitely use it in the near future!

Some feedback (can have):

  • A one-page option / alternative would be great - I don’t know how the conversion rate is with the popup
  • Have you thought about a captcha integration on the first page?

Thanks for the feedback @PeterTL

The color scheme can be edited. The layout and color scheme was largely inspired by a free template that Lead Pages highlighted as a good example. While that’s not a company I’d do business with, I’d trust them to know what they’re talking about when it comes to landing pages.

I’m most interested in how this concept works from the editor side and if I’ve missed anything that means it may not work as I think. However, I’ll consider a one-step option, though will need a bit of a rejig.

I’m no marketing expert, but have done a bit of research. Apparently there’s at least a couple of psychological factors in play with the two-step approach.

The first impression is meant to be of a page that is giving the reader something rather than trading it. Apparently this should render them in a more positive and open frame of mind. Obviously once they click the button, they discover they’re trading, but first impressions count and by this stage the concept of micro commitments comes into play. I.E., they’ve now made the conscious decision they want the lead magnet and they’re more likely to now follow through, as long as the process is as smooth and straightforward as possible.

There may be others who can offer a better insight on those views and comment on comparative conversion rates from experience.

Re a captcha, there is some kind of captcha field in the forms, but I’ve not used it. The sign up process should be as as frictionless as possible and I really dislike captchas when I’m filling in forms. If spam submissions are an issue, I’d look at handling it on the back end. I use a double opt-in and cull the contacts that don’t confirm within a period of time. Would that help in your case?

I am not the best reference here. To be honest, I don’t trust the editor very much. I always edit my landing pages and emails locally and paste them in raw HTML mode into Mautic.

That absolutely makes sense. On the other side I am a huge fan of putting the cards on the table: the contact should now from second one on that he will have to give his contact details in exchange for material. In my experience this works very well in practice. I am working in B2B marketing - maybe it is different in B2C. However, I would definitely gibt the 2-step-approach a chance and try it out.

I totally agree. However, some customers have such immense reach that SPAM is a real problem which cannot be handled efficiently on backend side. Still I don’t see a priority in captcha / SPAM prevention solutions.

I feel much the same way about the editor @PeterTL. I generally build landing pages on WordPress, but can see a need for a better selection of templates for those who can’t cope with HTML and don’t have their own websites. I’ve been surprised to find just how many people that applies to, but a very different segment to what your deal with.

I imagine your insight on B2B possibly being different to B2C could be the case. Consumers may feel a little more guarded about their personal email compared to a business email. I guess they also have a different mindset.

I think I recently read that Google were replacing the I’m not a robot captcha with something that, in most cases, works behind the scenes. If I recollect, it only intervenes if it’s unsure whether it’s dealing with a human or bot. Possibly I imagined it, but if not, that could make the virtual world a better place.